SUMMER 2022

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Climate of the Moors & Sea

THIS Quarterly issue investigates the local effects of climate change in our moorland, valley and coastal district. Tom Chadwick presents evidence of pollution blown onto the moors over several decades from fossil fuel power stations 70 kilometres away, causing long-lasting damage to nature. But we can be heartened by Marshall Best’s news of two large-scale clean energy hydrogen production plants planned for Teesside and the possibility to make this region a biosphere, plus other news of clean industries developing along our coastline – part of a low-carbon Bioeconomy for North Yorkshire.


Frank Thompson remembers sustainable farming in Glaisdale in the 1940s, while the National Park – busy restoring natural habitats destroyed by intensive agriculture and pollution – investigates how nature recovery might be privately financed in

the future. Brian Walker tells us what the Forestry Commission is doing to prepare local forests for climate change, while botanists Anne Press and Martin Allen call for protection of the biodiversity grimly hanging on in hedgerows – in many places, a last sanctuary for wildlife – and for re-wilding to help mitigate the climate crisis.

 

Locals are grouping to deliver food and services, future renewable energy, guided walks for health and, in a remarkable Cricket Club initiative in Glaisdale, to cement the community through cricket!

 

Other creative contributions delve into historical and cultural connections, with tales of whaling in the Arctic, the witch of Goathland, poems about rainforests and photographs of our glorious, precious region.

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Climate of the Moors & Sea

160 pages | full colour

£ 7 (inc. p&p) | £ 3 (digital)